Doro Wat

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Classic Ethiopian stew combining aromatic, warm spices, chicken, and eggs – wonderfully satisfying to cook as it fills your home with exotic fragrances, and a fantastic filling meal. Good-looking too!

Aloo Gobi with Panch Phoron

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Aloo Gobi (the name simply means “potatoes and cauliflower”) is a quintessentially Indian dish – simple in its preparation and ingredients, but remarkably complex in its flavors, and ability to complement just about any other dish. This version demonstrates how one can use the Bengali spice mixture, panch phoron, to quickly create a vibrant, bright-but-warm, complicated dish in very little time.

Chicken Curry

You might as well face it – everyone in the world is going to make a curry at least once in their lives.  It’s just a rule of cooking, and there’s good reason for it – a well-spiced homemade curry is one of the nicest things you can make, not only filling your home with the warm aromas of mixed spices but providing a wholesome, healthy, natural meal that is easy to make!

Kulon ma’-Bun’wra (Pan-Roast Lamb and Tomato)

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This is an adaptation of a rare but famed dish from Arrakis, served at family celebrations and community gatherings. The name simply means “kulon with bun’wra”: the kulon is a domesticated equine, the meat of which takes particularly well to spice; bun’wra is a savory fruit imported from tropical climates, as it obviously does not yet grow on Arrakis. The nearest Terran equivalent is “Pan-Roast Lamb and Tomato”, using the rich aromatic Persian spice mix, advieh, and the Bengali whole-spice blend, panch phoron. It is of course difficult to approximate the flavors and aromas of this dish with local ingredients, but I’ve tried my best using things one can find easily.

Damn! Lamb Chops!

It’s summer, and I’ve been grilling a lot over on Quince Street (you should come by sometime).  This 2015 creation was a big hit, everyone said the same thing upon the first bite… so the name for this dish came easy.

Strange Chicken

The name for this dish is a terrible pun derived from the French poulet étrangère, meaning “foreign chicken” – it is a combination of flavors from several disparate cuisines, including French, Caribbean, and southeast Asian elements.  A lively combination of savory, sweet, and spicy flavors, for a little somethin’ different.